Archive for the ‘Videos’ Category

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Genre Film Poster

November 17, 2009

Genre: Road Movie
Film Title: “Tokyo Drift” Good vs. Evil
Film: http://www.vimeo.com/7538242

Poster:

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Genre Film: Road Movie

November 11, 2009

“Tokyo Drift” Good vs. Evil

“Tokyo Drift” Good vs. Evil from Rachel Jacobs on Vimeo.

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Road Films

October 27, 2009

Road Films:
Road Films are included in a large range of genres including westerns, comedies, dramas, and action films. They often include searching for escape and engaging in quests. The earliest road movies were about discovering new land, and now they can be just about anything. Some of the most famous road films include Jack Kerouac’s On The Road, and Ernesto Guevara’s The Motorcycle Diaries.

Bonnie and Clyde

Dominant: Where is our eye attracted first? Why?
My eye is attracted to Bonnie and Clyde first. They are the first people on the screen, and they are in the viewer’s direct eye line according to the rule of thirds.

Lighting Key: High Key? Low Key? High Contrast? Some combination of these?
This scene is shot with high-key light mainly because it is filmed outside. It is during the daytime so you can see shadows of people and trees.

Shot and Camera Proxemics: What Type of shot? How Far away is the camera from the action?
The scene begins with an establishing shot. Then there is a medium shot with Bonnie and Clyde in the car. The medium shots then get mixed with close-ups. Once the action really picks up, when Bonnie and Clyde are being shot, there are a lot of extreme close-ups.

Angle: Are we (and the camera) looking up or down on the subject? Or is the camera neutral (eye level)?
The camera is looking up, down, and at eye level. The camera is letting us look at different points of view of the scenery and the action.

Color values: What is the dominant color? Are there contrasting foils? Is there color symbolism?
Green is the dominant color. It is seen in the surrounding nature, and when Bonnie and Clyde eat a green apple. Red is the contrasting foil, and it is very apparent when they are being shot to death. Green symbolizes growth, and red symbolizes danger and death.

Lens/ Filter/ Stock: How do these distort or comment on the photographed materials?
There aren’t any lens filters because the director wanted a very naturalistic looking film. When the camera pans up to follow the birds, there is a lens flare due to the sun.

Subsidiary contrasts: What are the main eye-stops after taking in the dominant?
After the dominant eye attraction, the main eye-stops are the green apple, the birds, and the shooting scene. The last eye-attraction is the bird’s eye view after Bonnie and Clyde are both dead.

Density: How much visual information is packed into the image? Is the texture stark, moderate, or highly detailed?
There is a great amount of visual information—as much information as you would see if you were there. The texture is moderate because you cannot see the detail of the tree’s leaves, but you can see the person’s emotions.

Composition: How is the two dimensional space segmented and organized? What is the underlying design?
If you were to apply the rule-of-thirds to this scene, a lot of the action happens in the center of the screen. The nature shots are spaced and wide open, and the action shots are closer together to capture more detail.

Form: Open or closed? Does the image suggest a window that arbitrarily isolates a fragment of the scene? Or a proscenium arch, in the visual elements are carefully arranged and held in balance?
The shots suggest a window for the viewer, but they don’t create a window. There are a variety of shots, but nothing too close up where you would not be able see out of a window.

Framing: Tight or loose? Do the characters have no room to move around, or can they move freely without impediments?
The framing is tight throughout for Bonnie and Clyde, but for the other man, the framing is loose. Bonnie and Clyde are in the car, so the window frame of the car sets up the framing of the shot, but their shots are also tight because they are in danger. The man’s shots are loose because he is not trapped and is in the open.

Death Proof

Dominant: Where is our eye attracted first? Why?
Our eye is attracted to Jungle Julia’s foot first because it is hanging out of the window, and
therefore, is out of the natural framing.

Lighting Key: High Key? Low Key? High Contrast? Some combination of these?
Low key lighting because the shot remains very dark, and they filmed the scene when it purely
dark outside.

Shot and Camera Proxemics: What Type of shot? How Far away is the camera from the action?
There are a lot of medium shots in the car. There are close-ups when they in the car before and during the fatal crash. As the women start to die, the camera shots are extreme close-ups.

Angle: Are we (and the camera) looking up or down on the subject? Or is the camera neutral (eye level)?
The camera is letting us view the scene neutrally through eye-level. There is one shot where we get a birds eye view to see the car going over the other car, but the majority of camera shots remain at eye-level.

Color values: What is the dominant color? Are there contrasting foils? Is there color symbolism?
The dominant color is black because of the color of the car and they are surrounded in black. The contrasting foil is red. Red can be seen flashing in the background throughout the scene to basically symbolize danger.

Lens/ Filter/ Stock: How do these distort or comment on the photographed materials?
The filters give the film a grainy look even though it was filmed digitally.

Subsidiary contrasts: What are the main eye-stops after taking in the dominant?
The main eye-stops are when each individual dies. The scene was edited to rewind and replay for each death. Each death was filmed in its own particular way.

Density: How much visual information is packed into the image? Is the texture stark, moderate, or highly detailed?
There is a lot of visual information packed into the scene. The texture is highly detailed because you can see the rain drops on the car window, the wind going through their hair, glass shattering during the crashes, and blood goes everywhere when they die.

Composition: How is the two dimensional space segmented and organized? What is the underlying design?
When the camera is focused on the car, the car is in the middle and is isolated by blackness on each side. Space is varied throughout the individual camera shots.

Form: Open or closed? Does the image suggest a window that arbitrarily isolates a fragment of the scene? Or a proscenium arch, in the visual elements are carefully arranged and held in balance?
The window of the car closes the form of the shots. The window also fragments the scene.

Framing: Tight or loose? Do the characters have no room to move around, or can they move freely without impediments?
The framing is tight. The characters don’t have any room to move around except for when their body parts are flying through the air. The last death, where the car tires run over the woman’s face, she is very closed in and cannot go anywhere

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Lumiere Film: Monday Night at Bender

October 20, 2009